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Rain in Brazil


See also: Temperature in Brazil

The graphics below show the levels of precipitation in Brazil.
Source of information: Brazilian Institute of Meteorology.
Based on data collected from 1961 to 1990.

For comparison purposes, visit this page with statistics about the weather in London.

rain summer Brazil Each of the four graphics show the pluviosity level accumulated in each trimester.
In all maps, the greener parts are wetter, while the redder are drier. See the exat scale, in milimeters of rain, at the bottom of each map.

First map shows pluviometry for the trimester January/February/March, which coincides grossly with the Brazilian summer.
The Amazon forest becomes very wet.
It is also the period when the southern States (including Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo) see more rain; even though not as heavy as in the Amazon, the rains are enough to cause traffic jams and land slides in the bigger cities, like São Paulo and Rio.

The states of Northeast, such as Pernambuco and Rio Grande do Norte, are still in the dry season; combined with the fact that January and February are the summer break of Brazilian schools, it explains the large influx of tourists to that region.
rain autumn
pluviosity winter
Above, left hand side map shows rain levels for period April/May/June, the Brazilian autumn; right hand side map shows rain for period July/August/September, grossly the Brazilian winter.
Autumn is drier than summer, and winter is the driest of all seasons.
The coast of Brazilian northeast has the wettest season during the autumn.
During the winter, the semi arid zone of the Northeast feels the drought; in some parts, years go by without a rainy day.

climate springs Brazil

The last map shows pluviosity levels in October/November/December, the Brazilian spring season.
Most of the country gets wetter, except for the Brazilian northeast, which gets drier.


Click the next link to see the levels of recent rain levels in Brazil.


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